Attending a Fleet Dinghy Cruise

If a calling notice has gone out advertising a daysail, there is some information that the Advanced Organiser (AO) and Officer Of the Day (OOD) needs in order to plan the day.

You will be asked on every occasion to let the AO and OOD know the following information.

1.Name(s) of attendees.

2. Contact numbers – including a telephone number for Friday evening and early Saturday morning ( if plans need to change or adverse weather forecast – Force 6 or more on the Inshore Forecast).

3. Contact details for a contact in case of incident (only to be used if you are incapacitated).

4. Level(s) of sailing experience/qualification?

5. Will you require a club dinghy space(s)?

6. Will you bring your own dinghy – if so do you require a crew?

7. Do you require Buoyancy Aids?

8. Do you have a tow bar/can you tow a club dinghy?

Note that we do not ask you to provide medical information which your skipper may need by electronic methods. If you have a medical condition, please brief your skipper and OOD discreetly and verbally.

We want to know this information for different reasons.

Requested Information Reason for asking for it
Name(s) of attendees. We need to know who is coming, if it’s more than one person please list all the people in your party
Contact numbers The planning of a dinghy daysail is sometimes very straightforward – if the weather has a stable pattern and the is a high likelihood of the cruise going ahead, then there’s no need to contact you at the last minute. However, sometimes the weather is changing every 6 hours, so we may need to contact you either late the night before or first thing in the morning. The Inshore Weather Forecast is published about 6am, and that’s the very last chance for the weather to be acceptable or unacceptable. We may need to contact you at the last moment and by phone or text. If we text you please text back to say you have received the last minute message.
Medical information If you have an ongoing medical concern and you may require those around you to take action to help you, both the OOD and your helm may need to know. Sailing is a physical activity, and you will be away from land for some hours, so we need to know of things that we need to look out for in order to maximise the chances of everyone being OK.
Contact details for a contact in case of incident In the unlikely chance of some kind of incident happening, we will want to be able to contact someone and let them know. Since your emergency contact may change from week to week, we ask this every time.
Level(s) of sailing experience/qualification? So that we can plan a balanced crew in our fleet.
Will you require a club dinghy space(s)? If you are a Dinghy Section member, we need to know that you want a space in a club boat. It might be that you crew a privately owned dinghy even if you have signed up to crew a club boat – this is a good thing as it gives you the chance to sail in different types of dinghy.
Will you bring your own dinghy – if so do you require a crew? So that we can plan the cruise.
Do you require Buoyancy Aids? So we know to bring them.
Do you have a tow bar/can you tow a club dinghy? So that we can plan the logistics to get the boats to the launch point.

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Brooklands visit

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John in his natural habitat

Cody visited the Brooklands Museum in late November and had a wonderful time. This is a very interesting place where some of the earliest achievements in British aviation occurred. As well as aircraft to look over and inside there were also many other exhibits. Some are great big things or strange objects such as a stratospheric chamber which was a surprise. Another more familiar looking large exhibit is a Concorde aircraft. Others displays were smaller, such as tiny biplanes and sound recordings of workers who made planes on this site. A really fascinating exhibit is a Wellington bomber that crashed into Loch Ness and was under water for 45 years. It was discovered by an American team looking for Nessie! The aeroplane has been restored to show its basic structure. Cody member John acted as our guide and he added greatly to our enjoyment of the visit. John knows a lot about aviation and navigation and he led us very well – thank you John! One of the aircraft on display is a┬áVarsity on which John did his RAF navigational training. When we got to the navigation desk on this plane John moved quickly and professionally into the seat and began to show us how all the instruments worked. It could have been back in the day!

There is much to see here and we could not do it all in a day even though we moved along purposefully. Del was an apprentice here back in the 1980s when aeroplanes were made on the site and he told us that he had not been back since he left. Memory lane for him. Our visit was very well timed because a major new exhibit hall showing off the Wellington and much other material had just been formally opened a couple of weeks ago. Some of us had been before, others of us said that they just need a bit of Cody encouragement to visit a place that they had always meant to visit but never had! We were amazed that so many aviation firsts had come from this site and that despite this the British aircraft industry had pretty well collapsed now. What went wrong?

This is such an interesting museum and we all agreed that we would like to come back another time to see what we had not had time to see on this visit. For Cody members who are not much enthused by the history of British aviation a future Cody social visit in the New Year will be to a National Trust house such as Petworth!

Stephen

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