Cody Sailing Club offer to the DCA – Poole Camp 2018

RYA Push the boat out runs for the whole of May, and we have two PTBO events, the family beach day a Stokes Bay and our Poole Camp.

Camping at Poole Camp

As offered during the Solent DCA Social on Saturday 3rd Feb 2018, Cody Sailing Club offer the opportunity for members of the Dinghy Cruising Association to join us on our 41st Poole Camp this year. The camp runs during the Hampshire Summer half term, May 26th to June 3rd.

In order to encourage participation in dinghy cruising we have extended free temporary membership to members of the DCA for just this camp.

The campsite is a commercial camp site run only for groups, and has a commercial nightly fee of £5 (to be confirmed for this year) per person. There is a flat £4 per person charge (irrespective of the number of nights you choose to stay with us) that Cody charge for using the waste facilities that we hire in. Tents only, no caravans or motor homes are allowed. Water is available from a tap in the field, and we hire in a waste tank. If you want to share a club portaloo in a loo tent you need to let me know. Nearest shops are in Corfe Castle and Wareham. Detailed directions will be sent to those who have expressed an interest.

Dinghy Cruising

The launch beach

We enjoy fleet dinghy cruising, and it is well known that members of the DCA are much more used to individual sailing.

There is no requirement or expectation that members of the DCA join in with our fleet cruising. You are welcome to join us, and not as you wish.

We sail as a fleet (or two separate fleets) and in order to sail together we need a fleet to have boats of roughly the same speed. If you wish to join us on our ‘Gold Fleet’, you’d need a vessel that is no slower than a Wanderer. We may also run a “Silver Fleet” if there is enough interest for slower boats and single handers, which will have a closer destination.

For close destinations we typically sail as a single fleet – Pottery Pier and Arne are places where we don’t split up – there’s enough fun to be had in the faster boats along the way that we’ll sail as a fleet and arrive at the same time.

Locations we like to daysail to include Swanage, Shell Bay Marine (for ice creams), round Brownsea, threading the islands, Rockley Point, Wareham, Studland (for ice creams), Bournemouth (for ice creams), Jazz Cafe (for ice creams) – there is a theme here…

Social

In the evenings we sometimes gather as a single group and have a communal cook-up on individual BBQs which turns into a camp fire, and we sit around and chat, or we’ll invade each other’s tents and chat if the weather is wet. We might go out for one evening to a local pub as a group.

Daysail to Bournemouth Pier

Safety

In common with the DCA we do not run a safety boat. Many of us carry VHF Radios, mobile phones and orange smoke flares for attracting the attention of emergency services if we need to. Sailing as a fleet, mostly with 2 or 3 crew means that if there is someone in difficulty we generally rally round to help. We also help each other with launching and recovery.

Launching and tides

In order to launch conventional dinghies such as a Laser 2000, GP14 or Comet Trio, we need a minimum tide height of 1.65m. Note that this means that for some parts of the lunar cycle it is not possible to launch at convenient times from the site.

Typical Spring Tide tidal curve

On this Spring tide day, for instance, we could launch at about 9am, and sail until 1pm, or sneak in on the second tide at 4pm.

Typical Neap tide tidal curve

However, with a Neap tide tidal prediction, we could launch for 8am and get back at 8pm, and would have to me mindful of the atmospheric pressure – a High pressure might suppress this tide and there be insufficient tidal height to launch.

We are expecting decent enough tides for good sails every day, the top of the Spring tide is the middle Wednesday of the half term week.

Join Us

If you are a member of dinghysolent please feel free to contact the commodore of Cody SC directly – you have my contact details. If you are from another DCA area and wish to join, please contact me at (and you need to manually correct this email address as I’m hiding it from spammers).

 

 

I look forward to welcoming you to the camp.

Steve
Commodore Cody SC.

 

Recent Posts

Brooklands visit

page4image27937840
John in his natural habitat

Cody visited the Brooklands Museum in late November and had a wonderful time. This is a very interesting place where some of the earliest achievements in British aviation occurred. As well as aircraft to look over and inside there were also many other exhibits. Some are great big things or strange objects such as a stratospheric chamber which was a surprise. Another more familiar looking large exhibit is a Concorde aircraft. Others displays were smaller, such as tiny biplanes and sound recordings of workers who made planes on this site. A really fascinating exhibit is a Wellington bomber that crashed into Loch Ness and was under water for 45 years. It was discovered by an American team looking for Nessie! The aeroplane has been restored to show its basic structure. Cody member John acted as our guide and he added greatly to our enjoyment of the visit. John knows a lot about aviation and navigation and he led us very well – thank you John! One of the aircraft on display is a Varsity on which John did his RAF navigational training. When we got to the navigation desk on this plane John moved quickly and professionally into the seat and began to show us how all the instruments worked. It could have been back in the day!

There is much to see here and we could not do it all in a day even though we moved along purposefully. Del was an apprentice here back in the 1980s when aeroplanes were made on the site and he told us that he had not been back since he left. Memory lane for him. Our visit was very well timed because a major new exhibit hall showing off the Wellington and much other material had just been formally opened a couple of weeks ago. Some of us had been before, others of us said that they just need a bit of Cody encouragement to visit a place that they had always meant to visit but never had! We were amazed that so many aviation firsts had come from this site and that despite this the British aircraft industry had pretty well collapsed now. What went wrong?

This is such an interesting museum and we all agreed that we would like to come back another time to see what we had not had time to see on this visit. For Cody members who are not much enthused by the history of British aviation a future Cody social visit in the New Year will be to a National Trust house such as Petworth!

Stephen

  1. Seventy Years and Thriving Comments Off on Seventy Years and Thriving
  2. Cold Shock Comments Off on Cold Shock
  3. Don’t always believe the forecast. Comments Off on Don’t always believe the forecast.
  4. Breakfast on the beach Comments Off on Breakfast on the beach
  5. Beautiful sailing weather Comments Off on Beautiful sailing weather
  6. Breezy and moist Comments Off on Breezy and moist
  7. An overnight stop at Wootton Comments Off on An overnight stop at Wootton
  8. Lymington to Newtown Creek Comments Off on Lymington to Newtown Creek
  9. Seafarers to Burlesdon Comments Off on Seafarers to Burlesdon