Cody Sailing Club offer to the DCA – Poole Camp 2018

RYA Push the boat out runs for the whole of May, and we have two PTBO events, the family beach day a Stokes Bay and our Poole Camp.

Camping at Poole Camp

As offered during the Solent DCA Social on Saturday 3rd Feb 2018, Cody Sailing Club offer the opportunity for members of the Dinghy Cruising Association to join us on our 41st Poole Camp this year. The camp runs during the Hampshire Summer half term, May 26th to June 3rd.

In order to encourage participation in dinghy cruising we have extended free temporary membership to members of the DCA for just this camp.

The campsite is a commercial camp site run only for groups, and has a commercial nightly fee of £5 (to be confirmed for this year) per person. There is a flat £4 per person charge (irrespective of the number of nights you choose to stay with us) that Cody charge for using the waste facilities that we hire in. Tents only, no caravans or motor homes are allowed. Water is available from a tap in the field, and we hire in a waste tank. If you want to share a club portaloo in a loo tent you need to let me know. Nearest shops are in Corfe Castle and Wareham. Detailed directions will be sent to those who have expressed an interest.

Dinghy Cruising

The launch beach

We enjoy fleet dinghy cruising, and it is well known that members of the DCA are much more used to individual sailing.

There is no requirement or expectation that members of the DCA join in with our fleet cruising. You are welcome to join us, and not as you wish.

We sail as a fleet (or two separate fleets) and in order to sail together we need a fleet to have boats of roughly the same speed. If you wish to join us on our ‘Gold Fleet’, you’d need a vessel that is no slower than a Wanderer. We may also run a “Silver Fleet” if there is enough interest for slower boats and single handers, which will have a closer destination.

For close destinations we typically sail as a single fleet – Pottery Pier and Arne are places where we don’t split up – there’s enough fun to be had in the faster boats along the way that we’ll sail as a fleet and arrive at the same time.

Locations we like to daysail to include Swanage, Shell Bay Marine (for ice creams), round Brownsea, threading the islands, Rockley Point, Wareham, Studland (for ice creams), Bournemouth (for ice creams), Jazz Cafe (for ice creams) – there is a theme here…

Social

In the evenings we sometimes gather as a single group and have a communal cook-up on individual BBQs which turns into a camp fire, and we sit around and chat, or we’ll invade each other’s tents and chat if the weather is wet. We might go out for one evening to a local pub as a group.

Daysail to Bournemouth Pier

Safety

In common with the DCA we do not run a safety boat. Many of us carry VHF Radios, mobile phones and orange smoke flares for attracting the attention of emergency services if we need to. Sailing as a fleet, mostly with 2 or 3 crew means that if there is someone in difficulty we generally rally round to help. We also help each other with launching and recovery.

Launching and tides

In order to launch conventional dinghies such as a Laser 2000, GP14 or Comet Trio, we need a minimum tide height of 1.65m. Note that this means that for some parts of the lunar cycle it is not possible to launch at convenient times from the site.

Typical Spring Tide tidal curve

On this Spring tide day, for instance, we could launch at about 9am, and sail until 1pm, or sneak in on the second tide at 4pm.

Typical Neap tide tidal curve

However, with a Neap tide tidal prediction, we could launch for 8am and get back at 8pm, and would have to me mindful of the atmospheric pressure – a High pressure might suppress this tide and there be insufficient tidal height to launch.

We are expecting decent enough tides for good sails every day, the top of the Spring tide is the middle Wednesday of the half term week.

Join Us

If you are a member of dinghysolent please feel free to contact the commodore of Cody SC directly – you have my contact details. If you are from another DCA area and wish to join, please contact me at (and you need to manually correct this email address as I’m hiding it from spammers).

 

 

I look forward to welcoming you to the camp.

Steve
Commodore Cody SC.

 

Recent Posts

Lymington to Newton Creek – February 2019

The forecast had held steady for several days; a F3-4 from the East for Saturday. Thursday was foggy, Jenny & Roy warned us on Friday of fog, and the BBC on Friday suggested that the wind would blow it away.
I started from home in thick fog and a bit of a heavy heart, because Ged has a long way to travel and I hoped it would be worth it. Ged trailed most of the way in bright sun, only plunging into fog at Dorchester.
In Lymington at 08:30 the sun was clear with light mist and the breeze a F3 from the East.

08:30 and the fog had lifted over the Solent

With Ged, Jim and me in the Swallow Storm 17, and Keith and Tim in their new-to-them Topper Sport 14 we left at 10:30 in a good enough breeze which held for at least 10 minutes before becoming extremely light. At the exact time of becalming, Chimet was showing F4 and Bramblemet showing a F5 from the East. We had got as far as the river entrance in 90 minutes.

Just as we launched the wind dropped

We could see zephyrs and little bits of wind as it filled in, and soon we were heading for Newton Creek, the Storm 17 pulling solidly in the breeze, full sun on our faces.

Becalmed at the entrance, while the East and Central Solent were at this moment enjoying a F4-5 from the East….
The entrance to Newton Creek, and the ebb had set in.

I’ve not been in a dayboat style boat before, and it’s a very lovely place to be; comfy cushions, a self tacking jib, great stability and excellent company. I was overwhelmed by the number of sticks and string, and it would take a little while to work out which rope did what. Ged has had Peewit for 4 years and has it mastered. 
We arrived late at the entrance to Newton Creek, the ebb had begun both in the main channel and at the entrance to the harbour itself, making it a challenge to get in. 

With the wind from the SE and the tide ripping out of Newton Creek, we had to plan carefully to get into the entrance.

By sailing very close to the shore we got out of the tide, shot the entrance accepting that we were briefly pushed into the main tidal stream, over-stood it by what looked like far too far and powered over the ebb on a close reach. It was a puzzle to solve and Jim did a great job of piloting us in, to find ourselves alone in the little lagoon on the western side of the harbour entrance.

The beautiful lagoon on the Western side of the Newton Creek entrance.

Keith had been fettling the complex set of ropes at the front of his boat, and continued to play in the main channel while we had a very quick lunch and began our return journey.
Many will recall the dramatic speed of the ebb in the Western Solent from previous excursions to Newton Creek. With an Easterly F3 we needed to reach straight across the waters heading North. We passed the big Starboard deep water channel buoy to the East, but were carried to the West of the Port mid channel marker as the ebb was full speed. The addition of a fourth sail to the Storm 17, a mizzen staysail, made a considerable difference to our speed. We all made Lymington entrance safely, landed, packed up and retired to the pub for a natter before heading home. 
It was remarkable how warm and sunny the day was, how empty Newton Creek was, and what a joy it was to be out and sailing a ~14 mile daysail in the middle of February in great company and in a lovely vessel. My thanks to Ged for offering me a crewing place and allowing me to helm his lovely vessel on the way home.

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