Attending a Fleet Dinghy Cruise

If a calling notice has gone out advertising a daysail, there is some information that the Advanced Organiser (AO) and Officer Of the Day (OOD) needs in order to plan the day.

You will be asked on every occasion to let the AO and OOD know the following information.

1.Name(s) of attendees.

2. Contact numbers – including a telephone number for the evening before and early on the morning of the planned sail ( if plans need to change or adverse weather forecast – Force 6 or more on the Inshore Forecast).

3. Contact details for a someone for us to reach out to in case of incident (only to be used if you are incapacitated).

4. Level(s) of sailing experience/qualification?

5. Number of club dinghy spaces?

6. Will you bring your own dinghy – if so do you require a crew?

7. How many Club Buoyancy Aids? What size?

8. Do you have a tow bar/can you tow a club dinghy?

Note that we do not ask you to provide medical information which your skipper may need by electronic methods. If you have a medical condition, please brief your skipper and OOD discreetly and verbally.

We want to know this information for different reasons.

Requested Information Reason for asking for it
Name(s) of attendees. We need to know who is coming, if it’s more than one person please list all the people in your party
Contact numbers The planning of a dinghy daysail is sometimes very straightforward – if the weather has a stable pattern and the is a high likelihood of the cruise going ahead, then there’s no need to contact you at the last minute. However, sometimes the weather is changing every 6 hours, so we may need to contact you either late the night before or first thing in the morning. The Inshore Weather Forecast is published about 6am, and that’s the very last chance for the weather to be acceptable or unacceptable. We may need to contact you at the last moment and by phone or text. If we text you please text back to say you have received the last minute message.
Medical information If you have an ongoing medical concern and you may require those around you to take action to help you, both the OOD and your helm may need to know. Sailing is a physical activity, and you will be away from land for some hours, so we need to know of things that we need to look out for in order to maximise the chances of everyone being OK.
Contact details for a contact in case of incident In the unlikely chance of some kind of incident happening, we will want to be able to contact someone and let them know. Since your emergency contact may change from week to week, we ask this every time.
Level(s) of sailing experience/qualification? So that we can plan a balanced crew in our fleet.
Will you require a club dinghy space(s)? If you are a Dinghy Section member, we need to know that you want a space in a club boat. It might be that you crew a privately owned dinghy even if you have signed up to crew a club boat – this is a good thing as it gives you the chance to sail in different types of dinghy.
Will you bring your own dinghy – if so do you require a crew? So that we can plan the cruise.
Do you require Buoyancy Aids? So we know to bring them.
Do you have a tow bar/can you tow a club dinghy? So that we can plan the logistics to get the boats to the launch point.

Recent Posts

Bosham Camp – Twice to Dell Quay

On Friday a couple of boats made a tour of the harbour, from Cobnor up to Dell Quay, then on the ebb to HISC and out of the harbour, then back to Cobnor on the early flood, arriving as the sun went down.
The evening social was lovely, around communal BBQ’s which then turned into camp fires (far enough off the ground to leave the the grass unharmed).
Saturday the camp started in full, and at 11am, 5 boats sailed to Dell Quay, in the flood through the moorings against the easterly wind. We were made very welcome at Dell Quay SC, and sat on their sunny verandah, eating lasagna and cake. The return journey was a drift for most of the way, with a southerly wind picking up near Deep End, so we decided to run to Bosham for an ice cream. We arrived at Bosham SC’s concrete slipway in the teeth of the ebb tide, gained ice cream and made the beat through the moorings for home just as the fierce ebb was slowing, arriving at about 17:00.
The evening was again a lovely gathering, with two members joining us for the campfire on the field from their yacht that they sailed around from Portsmouth. We finally found out how one of them broke their finger.
Sunday morning saw six boats head out into a westerly wind, and the spring flood was too fierce with the little wind to make out to Chalkdock, so we settled happily for Dell Quay again, with the wind from completely the other direction. A dead run in very light winds, and the sea breeze built behind us and we arrived at Dell Quay at noon. Fortunately their racing fleet was just away and we were welcomed for a second lunchtime to DQSC’s verandah, more lasagna, piri-piri chicken and lashing of hot tea and coffee. We left at the top of the tide, 13:20, and the breeze stiffened to a F3 for the beat through Chichester Pool, and the reach along Itchenor Reach and back to the camp.
All this on both days was in horizon to horizon sunshine, and dry sailing in shorts and t-shirts.
Good weather, good company and lovely sailing.

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