Cody Daysailing Guidelines

Sailing guidelines

These guidelines are provided to assist you in ensuring that your boat and experience match the kind of daysail that we are planning.

These guidelines are drawn from best practice and practical experience of our members and other similar organisations undertaking activities as our own. They have been drawn together in this document to assist members in ensuring that boats, equipment and crew experience, match the kind of day sail that the club is planning. Due to other mitigating circumstances, it is most likely that some of the recommendations and suggestions below will not be practical to implement and the document is intended for use as a set of guidelines only.

If you are new to sailing please do not be put off by this document as there is always a requirement to balance the strengths of our boat crews. This ensures new sailors or those new to sailing on tidal waters have the opportunity to sail with and learn from our more experienced members.

The essentials

We don’t plan to sail if there is a force 6 in the Met Office Inland Waters Forecast for the area where we plan to sail.

An Important note, the skipper of a sailing dinghy has a legal responsibilityfor the safety of their boat, their crew and other mariners and nothing here changes that legal responsibility. It is therefore an essential requirement, that boat skippers are competent to make impromptu decisions regarding the safety of their boat and crew, outside of the planned Cody event, should the need arise due to any extenuating circumstances. 

It should also be noted, the areas that are designated in the three categories below are segregated for guidance and relevant to sailing those areas in benign summer conditions. Weather and tidal state, will play a big part in the conditions that a crew will be faced with on any given day and can and will change in an instant and which could make a fairly benign sail into a more demanding experience, even when sailing on inland waters and shall always be significant factors in what you will experience on tidal waters.

Remember the Solent is busy with commercial shipping from Portsmouth and Southampton through defined shipping lanes. A keen lookout while crossing shipping lanes and avoidance of all commercial shipping vessels is essential. If you are not sure you are able to cross a shipping lane in time to be well clear of an approaching vessel, then alter course to go behind the vessel and skippers should be aware at all times where these shipping lanes and associated restrictions impact their passage plans.


Local sailing (in high winds) at Plymouth

CATEGORY 1 – Eg, Inland, beach days, local sailing at camp.

If skippering a club boat, a minimum expected competency of RYA Level 2 or a qualification of equivalent standard, plus regular skippering to maintain skills and with a tidal endorsement if sailing on tidal waters.

Boat

  • Should have suitable buoyancy so that it will float in the event of a capsize
  • £3,000,000 liability insurance

Helm and crew

  • Should be able to maneuver a boat in forecast conditions without risk of collision. – Be aware of collision avoidance rules – ‘rights of way’.
  • Skipper be familiar with sailing area proposed, understand the potential hazards within that area and be competent to mitigate those hazards.
  • Be able to right boat after capsizing.
  • Be able to reef a boat ashore to balance the sail plan to the strengths of the helm and crew.
  • Your personal fitness, the fitness of your crew, the quality of your equipment and vessel need to be proportionate to the risks likely to be experienced in the activity you are about to undertake. 

RECOMMENDED EQUIPMENT

  • Basic First Aid Kit including survival bag
  • Buoyancy aids, bailer, and suitable clothing, (note the sea temperature on our southern shores is very cold, even in the summer, so a minimum of a wetsuit, wet boots and wind resistant waterproofs to put over the suit is recommended, given that launching, recovering and sailing dinghies is almost guaranteed to be a wet experience.
  • Compass and chartlet to navigate in low visibility conditions (recommended for tidal waters)
  • Tow rope and at least two good paddles – so you can propel the boat to safety or towed to safety in the event of no wind or halyard etc failure.
  • Whistle – So that you can raise an alarm
  • Knife (Preferably a safety knife) – So you can cut ropes in an emergency, also cake and cheese.
  • Water / hot drinks – maintain morale, energy levels and hydration.
  • Sun cream.

Sailing while reefed on the Solent – Stokes Bay

CATEGORY 2 – Day Sailing

E.g. Day sailing (anything that involves going somewhere for lunch and then sailing back), inside the bar at Chichester, Salcombe, Helford and the Solent 

However, it should be noted weather and tidal state, will play a big part in the conditions that a crew will be faced with on any given day and can and will change in an instance and which could make a fairly benign sail into a more hair raising experience and shall always be significant factors in what you will experience on tidal waters.

If skippering a club boat on Category 2 and more adventurous day-sailing, you will need a minimum required competency of a recently taken RYA Seamanship Certificate or qualification of equivalent standard, plus regular sailing to keep the experience fresh.

Boat

  • An ability to be reefed easily whilst afloat, so that should conditions underway change for the worse, you can alter the sail area easily to match those conditions. If this is not possible, your passage plan should include escape points, so that you can easily make changes and get yourself to shore and to suitable recovery.

Skipper with the help of the crew should be able to

  • Safely handle the boat in F5 winds and moderate sea conditions
  • Have the knowledge and confidence to reef the boat quickly whilst afloat.
  • Have the ability to navigate using charts, tidal data and compass, so you can independently figure out the way home if there is an emergency or you get separated from the fleet
  • Know where on the water to sail to take the most advantage of and to avoid difficulties caused by tides.
  • Can keep the vessel safe and away from the shore by the proper use of an anchor.
  • Passage plan– In order to know where you are going independently of the OOD briefing, in case an emergency occurs, or you find yourself separated from the rest of the fleet
  • Ensue your personal fitness, the fitness of your crew, the quality of your equipment and vessel is proportionate to the risks identified in your passage plan. 

Recommended Equipment

  • Mobile smart phone in waterproof bag – in order to contact emergency services if required – navigation app
  • Basic First aid kit including survival bag
  • Proper anchor, (preferably not grapnel), of a suitable size with 2m chain and 30m of rode, (leaded rode is a very viable alternative to chain for easier stowage on a dinghy) – So you can deploy and hold the vessel away from the shore should the need arise.
  • Whistle – So that you can raise an alarm.
  • Throw-over-the-side Orange Smoke to guide the approach of emergency services if needed.
  • Safety Knife – So you can cut ropes in an emergency, also cake and cheese.
  • Compass and chartlet to navigate in low visibility conditions.
  • Wet suit or dry suit with waterproofs and spare clothing in dry bag – to stay safe and comfortable in variety of changing weather conditions.
  • Food, Water / hot drinks– maintain morale, energy levels and hydration.
  • Sun cream.
  • Oars and rowlocks and / or outboard and / or at least two good paddles and a tow rope – so you can propel the boat to safety or be towed to safety, in the event of no wind or gear failure.
  • Sturdy bucket or bailer attached to boat on lanyard – So you can empty the boat of water in the event of capsize (applies to all vessels).

Consider additional equipment

  • Navigation App
  • Basic spares for boat – So the boat can remain seaworthy if something breaks or goes wrong
  • Map/chart – So you know where you are, and can avoid hazards
  • Basic outboard spares and tools, so you can repair the outboard if it stops working.

An adventurous sail to Whitecliffe Bay from Stokes Bay

CATEGORY 3 – Open Waters

e.g. Open water sailing, e.g. beyond Hurst point and Bembridge, outside the bar at Chichester, Salcombe, Helford and the Solent in general in anything beyond benign summer weather conditions and multiple day cruising.

If skippering a club boat on Category 3 and more adventurous day-sailing, a minimum expected competency of a recently taken RYA Seamanship Certificate or qualification of equivalent standard, plus regular sailing to keep the experience fresh.

Everything for Category 1 and 2 plus:

Boat

  • Be able to sail at the same speed or faster than a well helmed Wanderer (PY1190) – So that you can keep up with the fleet OR the cruise shall have a passage plan that considers all the craft planned to take part in an event.

Skipper

  • Ability to navigate using charts and compass – So you can independently figure out the way home if there is an emergency or you get separated from the fleet

Recommend Additional Equipment to categories 1 & 2

  • Basic spares for boat – So the boat can remain seaworthy if something breaks or goes wrong
  • Map/chart– So you know where you are, and can avoid hazards

Consider Additional equipment

  • Waterproof VHF – So you can contact maritime emergency services
  • Proper Fenders and Mooring warps, two long and two short – So you can moor against a pontoon
  • Second anchor, chain and rode – So you can hold the vessel securely in position
  • Comprehensive spares/repair kit – So you can mend common issues with equipment
  • Waterproof torch – So you can show a light if the cruise runs over the expected time
  • Emergency Services Guides – Flares / LED Flare – So you can guide emergency services to the scene of an emergency
  • Emergency rations – So you can survive an emergency for 12 hours
  • Sufficient funds to be able to leave your vessel elsewhere, and take public transport back to your towing vehicle to be able to recover your vessel in the event of an incident that renders your vessel unusable.

Your personal fitness, the fitness of your crew, the quality of your equipment and vessel need to be proportionate to the risk on your passage plan, and you would be following best practices for multi-day dinghy cruises that are beyond the scope of this document.

Recent Posts

Chichester Harbour Summer 2021

Cobnor Summer Camp

This year we held a long weekend summer Cobnor camp and were fortunate to have excellent sunny weather. Thirteen families turned up and enjoyed sailing, paddle boarding and kayaking. The evenings were spend in sunshine chatting and barbequing. A diary of this long weekend is given below.

Wednesday June 10th

08:30 and Sarah Louise and Steve arrived, got Sarah’s Trio rigged and launched into a rising tide and the barest wisps of wind in blue skies and full sun. The drive down had been foggy, the IOW was obscured by fog, and yet just along the strip of coast the sun blazed down. We took 90 minutes of sneaky shallows sailing to make Chalkdock against the flood, and with an hour to go turned for Dell Quay. The SW F1-2 became a southerly F2-3 along the Itchenor reach and we then broad reached to the pub.

The pub required us to sit down and be served, and so we sat on an outdoor sofa which overlooked the water. We had a lovely chat with two canoe paddlers who were randomly assigned the sofa next to us. I’d say more salty than all of us; several transatlantic crossings in a Contessa32, and many salty adventures around the Bahamas.

Soon after the tide turned, we began the beat home in a F2-3, reached the Itchenor channel, and met Adri and Anna coming back from Bosham, where we returned to, took in Ice Creams and headed home in a sporty F4 for a bit of camping. Ginny and Phil arrived and camped.

Thursday June 11th

The plan was for Dell Quay for lunch and Bosham for afternoon ice cream, a tried and trusted crowd pleaser.

The plan unfolded as expected, we were in no hurry to launch as the overcast skies would lead to no sea breeze and the forecast was for more wind in the afternoon. Ginny in her Scow, John and Phil in Phil’s Versa, Anna and Adri in the club Versa and Sarah-Louise and Steve in Sarah’s Trio left the hard at 10:30, headed up-tide and got to Park (beyond Roman Transit) before turning at 11:10 for Dell Quay. We were making a good headway and were about 90 minutes off East Head as we continued onwards.

The broad reach, reach and run saw the fleet at the pub at about 12:15, and we got adjacent outdoor tables where beer, chips and cheesy chips were enjoyed before repairing to the beach for our sandwiches.

The ebb spurred us to action, the beat was good with the tide beneath us, the reach gusty, the run to Bosham slightly eventful. A patch of weed tripped the rudder on the Trio, and we gybed into a broach; fortunately, nothing was there to broach into.

The ice creams at Bosham were good. While I was holding all the boats I was interrogated by a Conservancy Officer regarding a lack of Conservancy stickers, and fortunately we had all phoned in and got a 5-day permit (for which no sticker is issued). Also note that BSC charge if you land on their slipway, but I was holding the boats while still in the water so apparently that does not count. (Also note that even if you have a conservancy sticker, it’s a further £7 per day to launch a dinghy from Itchenor).

The return to Cobnor was a challenging beat with the raging ebb, we reefed just to make it more handleable.

And now the sun has finally come out.

Friday June 12th

Overnight, Ged, Archie and Lisbeth arrived.

The crew were Steve and Lisbeth, Sarah and Ginny in Trios, Phil and John, Anna and Adri in Versas and Ged and Archie in the Storm17.

We launched at 10am into a SW F3 overcast and drizzling, and beat against the flooding tide to East Head where we stopped briefly at 11:15.

The journey to Mengeham Rythe crossed the incoming flood, and then we were carried by it and through the first moorings. It gets tight on the way to My Lord’s Pond, with boats in bow to stern trots and a dead end to avoid. All made it handsomely on the beat there, many tight tacks, and we settled in the now bright sunshine on the North shore for an hour of siesta, lunch and snoozing.

The start of the ebb jolted us into action, and we made our way out which was much easier on the broad reach and run. When we made North of HISC the VHF came alive with a hail from Cody members who have a yacht; Jenny and Roy had sailed to East Head on a whim, so we sailed over and said hello.

We stopped to regroup on Pilsey, passing the deep water Port Hand post the correct side, and just for fun sailed to “Star” racing mark before turning home. Ginny had her racing head on, and Sarah’s Trio was uncatchable. Some had interesting gybes on the way home, some sat majestically running dead downwind without a care in the world, upon cushions.

We arrived home about 1530.

Saturday Sailing

The fleet set off at about 11am after investing some time in working out the club Versa spinnaker.

Mel and Anna, Martin and Ben, Phil and Lisbeth in Versas, Edmund and Isabelle in their Trio, Ged and Archie in the Storm17 and Stephen and Jackie paddled canoes while John took his paddle board. Adri went for a walk, as did Andrea.

Wind was light and variable until Birdham Pool when the sea breeze set in. The sailing was good. The tide was still flooding, so the fleet was anchored. Dell Quay Sailing Club made us most welcome with legendary scones. The fleet left just after 14:00 into a S F3, which built to a F4 at times. In glorious sunshine we beat through Birdham Pool to a close reach along the channel past Itchenor. Steve and Simon joined the fleet for the Itchenor reach, then carried on to East Head for a play in the bigger winds as we broad reached with the spinnaker up home. Someone, not us, using the slipway was lowering their boat, having neglected attaching it to the trolley and the boat fell off the trolley pinning someone between the boat and the wall. We were fortunately out of the way and no major harm was done but it’s a reminder to keep the boat attached to the trolley.

Thanks to Phil for leading the daysail.

Saturday Paddling

Jackie and Stephen Deakin were in their sleek kayaks and John was on his 5th trip on his new Bluefin Cruise 10.8 (SUP).

The outbound leg was in ideal conditions; with the tidal current and in very light winds. The light winds meant that we took about the same time as the dinghies to reach Dell Quay.
By the time of our return the tide had turned and the sea breeze had set in at about 15kts which made for very different conditions. John decided to sit down on his board using the kayak seat that clips to his board, otherwise standing up would have been torturous. He also made use of the second paddle blade to make a double-ended set.

Overall we recorded a 7 mile round trip. It was only after we returned that Stephen noted Jackie was nearly an Olympic rower, which explains why she left Stephen and John far in her wake at times. Like any hard work it was a slog at times but a good achievement in retrospect.

Even in the windy conditions we made the return journey again in a similar time to the dinghies

Roll on future Cody paddling trips!

Sunday (14th) Paddlers

Phil on his kayak and John with his SUP set off from Cobnor at 0945, just before the slipway closed for the Oppy launching window. They had a very pleasant paddle to Bosham with the tidal current and the wind. Following the well established Cody tradition, they stopped at Bosham for an early ice cream. As the tide still had a way to rise and they didn’t fancy a long mud walk, they decided to chance the Bosham Sailing Club slipway and left their craft on the green.

Ice creams consumed, they returned to the green and were stealthily making their way to the slipway when a Bosham Quay staff member came out of his office to demand a fee (£5 each) for using the slipway. After relaunching they made their way further up the Bosham channel as far as they could go with the water available. As they turned to make their way back to Cobnor the tide was against them and there was a healthy breeze. It was hard going on his feet for John on his SUP, so he tried paddling from his knees. Using just the SUP one- ended paddle still made for slow progress, so he added the second blade. Not expecting a breeze John hadn’t taken his kayak seat for his SUP, so he had to sit back on his feet to paddle.

They made steady progress heading back to Cobnor, arriving about 1145 just as the Oppies were finishing their morning racing. It took John a while to be able to get his legs straight, but it was another valuable SUP journey to put in the experience bank.

Sunday Sailing

The weather on Sunday was light winds but gloriously sunny and hot. Seven Cody boats sailed from Cobnor to Dell quay late morning after a racing fleet of Optimists had launched. We found a bit of wind and it was a beat/reach to the pub

The weather on Sunday was light winds but gloriously sunny and hot. Seven Cody boats sailed from Cobnor to Dell quay late morning after a racing fleet of Optimists had launched. We found we needed to take into account the Open Meeting at Bosham SC where about 20 Mirrors and 35 Optimists were racing, so we left after the race fleets were on the water. Keith and Lois joined us from Itchenor in their Sport 14. Mel and Steve, Rob and Adri, Sarah and Simon and Lisbeth in Trios, Martin and Ben in their Versa and Ged and Archie in their Storm17.

We slightly entangled ourselves in the Optimist fleet, and mostly kept out of the way as the tiny humans battled with surprisingly different levels of ability to round their racing mark near Deep End. The clear blue sky did not lift a convincing sea breeze and we were left with puffs and patches of wind from the South as we took the flood to Dell Quay.

Lunch was taken both at the Pub, at the Sailing Club on their veranda and on the beach under the shade of a foreshore tree.

The return trip was uneventful, the wind dropping to barely allow us over the ebbing tide to Cobnor.
We packed up in a crowded carpark and headed home.

This posting was collectively created by the attendees of the camp.

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