Dinghy Racing

Dinghy Racing

The Club has a number of keen racers within its membership and promotes dinghy racing activities through a number of events:

10 Hour Relay Race – Frensham Pond Sailing Club

This event is held during a summer day at Frensham Pond Sailing Club. The race is open to teams racing the Club boats.

Match Racing – Frensham Pond Sailing Club

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We normally try to hold two series of match races, one in the spring or early summer at or near the end of the Level 1+2 course and one in the late summer after our summer camp. Both of these series use the Club boats on Frensham pond usually on a weekday evening and are open to all members. The racing is competitive, but not too serious and is an ideal introduction to club racing. Each series usually culminates in a race afternoon held at the weekend usually coinciding with a social event (Summer Social in July and the Late Summer Social in September). The races are usually held on an individual helm basis and trophies are awarded for best helm and best novice helm.

Summer Camp Regatta

A highlight of the Clubs annual camp is the Regatta, usually held sometime during the middle weekend. The day consists of races in a number of different categories. There is a handicap race open to all and a ladies helm race as well as races for the coveted ‘GP’ and ‘mirror’ trophies.

Bart’s Bash

Bart’s Bash is a charity event to raise funds the help transform the lives of young people through sailing. We are looking to put teams into the next race in the Autumn.

Winter Series – Frensham Pond Sailing Club

The club Comet Trios are available to Dinghy Section members and there are handicap series on both Saturday and Sunday.

Comet Trio Nationals

The club boats can be taken to any Comet Trio Open Meeting and Nationals. Any Comet Trio rigged as our boats are, with the sails from the standard sailmakers and just as they are can be taken to any Comet Trio event and it’s in class. That also means that you can race our Comet Trios in any handicap race as well, and it’s within class and ready to go.

Pictures of our boats at the Comet Trio Nationals in 2015 with thanks to Mike Rice.

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Round Isle of Sheppey Race Notes

A good sail is the longest dinghy race in Europe, and the notes for the race will help future explorers enter this race without making the mistakes that we made on our first year.

Recent Posts

Mind the laundry – adventures on the Exe.

A last minute decision to take a trip to Exmouth on the evening of Friday 5th October saw Mel and Steve travel to Exmouth to join Nick and others on a daysail in the estuary on Saturday.

The forecast had been for F4-5 from the East and Topsham would have been an easy destination, but as the week progressed the forecast abruptly changed to zero for Saturday morning.

The millpond of the estuary – paddling only…

And it is onto a millpond of reflection that four boats began the paddle; Nick and his crew in his beautiful Trio, two people in the Wayfarer and two in an RS Vision (I apologise, I am useless at remembering names). After an hour, and with 20 minutes left of the flood tide it was clear that Topsham was not a likely destination, and we diverted to the unbelievably picturesque Lympstone. This is where the laundry comes into the story – the dwellings in Lympstone have no gardens, and the locals have taken to hanging their washing on the shoreline on ropes strung between great wooden poles to dry.

Foreshore laundry.

We avoided the laundry as we made land and shortly afterwards enjoyed the hospitality of Susannah’s Tea Room, a lovely traditional coffee-shop cum centre-of-village-life walkers cafe with yummy cake and drinks.
While we were enjoying the good company and coffee, the wind built to a F3 from the SW. The other boats headed back, and we followed the navigation marks to Topsham. As it happens, the twists and turns of the navigable river forced us to enjoy some lovely spinnaker broad reaches.
The water gets shallow in Topsham, and without local knowledge we chose not to land, because it looked like it would be easy to get stranded; at one point it looked as if we were in the middle of the channel and were in only in 70cm of water with 40m to the shore…

The beat back to Exe SC was in F3-4 was with the ebb tide under us. We briefly stopped at a secluded beach just north of Lympstone, nestled between the red Triassic rocks of the area, and mused that a Cody SC expedition to this estuary should include a stop here for lunch. In total, we sailed about 14 miles.

Triassic Rocks and Trio.

Thanks to Nick for arranging the facility at Exe SC, and pies, Laura for helping us drop the boat at the sailing club late on Friday, the skippers and crew of the other boats (I should have taken a pad and paper with me) for their engaging and knowledgable company at the coffee stop, and apologies again to Annie for shying a soft drink all over her just after she’d provided it to me at the bar.

The wind on Sunday was forecast F4-6, and when we got to the club, also blowing a F4-6 so we left the racers to it.

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